Tag Archives: Terry Pratchett

Top Ten Tuesday! The Ten Best Books I’ve Ever Read. What Are Yours?

Like the title says, these are the ten best books that have ever read. They’re my favorites. Yours may be different. In fact, I’m hoping they are. Either in the comments or, in your own blog post with a link back, I’d like you to share some of your favorite books so that we can all maybe find a new favorite book or author from each other. Of course I won’t shamelessly plug my own books by putting them on my list, but if you want to, I won’t argue.

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10. The Vampire LeStat: by Anne Rice. Unbeknownst to most people (you know it’s serious when I use big words like unbeknownst) it wasn’t Stephanie Meyer who invented the vampire genre, but Anne Rice about fifteen years earlier. LeStat, referred to as the Brat Prince, is such a fun character you’ll want to become one of the undead just to hang out with him for eternity.

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9. The Da Vinci Code: by Dan Brown. The first in the series was easily the best. Don’t watch the movie because Tom Hanks stars in it with a ridiculously bad hairdo, but read the book.

8. How to Succeed in Evil: by Patrick E. McLean. Edwin Windsor is an Evil Efficiency Expert who contacts out his services to help supervillains be more villanous. Hilarious!  You end up rooting for evil!

7. Bite Me: by Christopher Moore, award winning, New York Times bestselling author who I interviewed for The Phil Factor about three years ago. Spoiler alert: This won’t be his only book on the list. Trust me on Christopher Moore. You’ll want to read so many of his books. Bite Me skewers the vampire genre with brilliant sarcasm.

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6. Dave Barry’s Complete Guide to Guys: by Pulitzer Prize winning Dave Barry, whom I interviewed for The Phil Factor in 2013. If you’re a woman, you’ll laugh as you read countless hilarious examples of the idiocy of men. If you’re a guy you”l see yourself in so many of the true stories.

5. 11/22/63: by Stephen King. I hope you didn’t watch the Hulu miniseries. They took some liberties with the plot that I didn’t think were necessary and detracted from the story. Read the book. It’s a surprising love story.

4. Good Omens: by Neil Gaimans and Terry Pratchett. Read. Laugh. Thank me later. Both authors are cherished titans of English literature, and their other solo works are brilliantly funny. Together they don’t disappoint.

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3. The Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy: by Douglas Adams. This book is a literary classic. Do not, I repeat, DO NOT watch the movie. Read the book. Your cultural education cannot be considered complete until you’ve read this book.

2. A Dirty Job: by Christopher Moore. Being the Grim Reaper is a tough job, but somebody’s got to do it. Hilarity galore. If you enjoy the absurdity of Douglas Adams and Terry Pratchett, then you’ll also love Christopher Moore.

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1. Odd Thomas: by Dean Koontz. In general I consider Dean Koontz to be Stephen King lite, but Odd Thomas is his signature character. I read books from a first person point of view. I become the protagonist when I read. Some characters fit in my head better than others. Odd Thomas fit me like a glove. For me, he was one of those characters where I wasn’t sure if I wanted to be him or have him as my best friend. I read the first Odd Thomas novel at least a decade ago and was disappointed earlier this year when, after 16 novels, the series came to an end.
Those are my top ten. What are yours? Answer in the comments or create a post and link back so we can all find a few more good reads.

Have a great Tuesday! ~Phil

Throwback Thursday! Rest in Fun Terry Pratchett

This week is the two year anniversary of the passing of one of my favorite authors. If you don’t know his work, I hope this persuades you to read one of his books.

Picture credit: BBC News

(03/15/2015) The literary world has lost a wonderful writer. Sir Terry Pratchett died yesterday at the age of 66 due to Alzheimers. In the title I wrote ‘Rest in Fun’ and I believe that Terry will certainly be having a wonderful time in the afterlife. Yes, if there is an afterlife, I believe that Terry Pratchett probably embraced the new adventure he embarked upon yesterday. Why would I think this? I think this because he wrote of Death. It was a character in some of his books.

The Independent: “But unlike the cold, stereotypical hooded figure wielding a scythe, Pratchett’s Death is a haphazard figure who we see embarking on the very human experiences of getting drunk, dancing wildly and even hankering after happiness. He likes cats. He enjoys curry.”

From his hilarious book Good Omens: ‘DON’T THINK OF IT AS DYING,’ said Death. ‘JUST THINK OF IT AS LEAVING EARLY TO AVOID THE RUSH.’

From his book, Sourcery: ‘Death isn’t cruel, merely terribly, terribly good at his job.’

From Terry’s Twitter yesterday:
Terry’s books were very funny satire and fantasy on all manner of the human condition. If you haven’t read him yet, Good Omens, which he co-wrote with Neil Gaimans, is one of my favorites.

Have a great Friday! You too Terry. ~Phil

Rest in Fun Terry Pratchett

Picture credit: BBC News

Picture credit: BBC News

The literary world has lost a wonderful writer. Sir Terry Pratchett died yesterday at the age of 66 due to Alzheimers. In the title I wrote ‘Rest in Fun’ and I believe that Terry will certainly be having a wonderful time in the afterlife. Yes, if there is an afterlife, I believe that Terry Pratchett probably embraced the new adventure he embarked upon yesterday. Why would I think this? I think this because he wrote of Death. It was a character in some of his books.

The Independent: “But unlike the cold, stereotypical hooded figure wielding a scythe, Pratchett’s Death is a haphazard figure who we see embarking on the very human experiences of getting drunk, dancing wildly and even hankering after happiness. He likes cats. He enjoys curry.”

From his hilarious book Good Omens: ‘DON’T THINK OF IT AS DYING,’ said Death. ‘JUST THINK OF IT AS LEAVING EARLY TO AVOID THE RUSH.’

From his book, Sourcery: ‘Death isn’t cruel, merely terribly, terribly good at his job.’

From Terry’s Twitter yesterday:

Terry’s books were very funny satire and fantasy on all manner of the human condition. If you haven’t read him yet, Good Omens, which he co-wrote with Neil Gaimans, is one of my favorites.

Have a great Friday! You too Terry. ~Phil